Winning at Social Media: 6 Ways Athletes Can Get it Right

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Top-tier interscholastic and collegiate athletes are some of the most popular figures on social media with hundreds of thousands of followers. Their posts get major media attention, for reasons both good and bad. Here are six tips for coaches to guide their athletes on social media use.

Have a goal for social media.

Whether it’s to build their brand, connect with fans or simply to get noticed, athletes should have a goal for their social media presence to develop a strategy and stay focused.

Understand social media is public.

Different platforms have different privacy settings, which means posts could be read by people they’re not intended to reach. Check privacy settings to specify the audience.

Interact with fans and athletes.

Social media is an interactive platform (as the name suggests) so it’s important for athletes to interact with the people who follow them: fans, media and other athletes. Engagement is key.

Limit posts during the day.

Managing social media is easier with a posting schedule. Athletes should create a daily or weekly routine, as routine, consistent posts help build followings. Athletes also should avoid posting when upset or partying, at the risk of posting something regrettable.

Share and promote other accounts.

The “social” part of social media means it goes both ways. Engaging, sharing and promoting other accounts means they’ll do the same. It’s a great marketing move for student athletes.

Protect password and login information.

It prevents others from assuming the identity of the owner of the account and posting things that may be off-brand or, at worse, private and personal.

The Ohio University online Master of Coaching Education instructs students in coaching at multiple levels: interscholastic, collegiate, professional or Olympic sports. The course teaches current standards in coaching methodology, strength and conditioning, sports psychology and sports administration. Find out more at onlinemasters.ohio.edu/masters-coaching-education/